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Foreigner, you must remember that these claims are coming from the "boys who cry wolf every chance they get" club and that no evidence has been presented. The China Post's excuses are meaningless as well. (Yeah, I saw your footnote.)

Why would the party infamous for the "228 Incident" and "White Terror" use words like kill, die, dead, death, to death, bullet, gun, shoot, etc. if others would do an equal job of carrying the non-murderous meaning they supposedly intend -- or are they simply inarticulate mickeyfickeys falling back on their far-more-vulgar-than-what-I-just-avoided standards?

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A great point I hadn't considered. A TRULY reformed person (or political party) that has a history of violence would avoid using violent rhethoric so as not to give cause for alarm.

Thanks for bringing that up.

Good post. I gotta start my round ups again, so you all can get the traffic you deserve.

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Thanks. I've really missed your weekly round-ups. The time required to put them together must've been enormous though, so I certainly understand why you had to cut back.

(Cut back? Ha! When Michael Turton cuts back on blogging, he STILL makes the rest of us look like slackers!)

Just a quick comment on Ma's "public death threat." I'm certainly no fan of Ma, but his phrasing is a very common expression in Mandarin that could be translated as "heading for a big fall/defeat" and could in no way be construed as an actual death threat. I was pretty surprised when I saw the clip of that speech on the news--it sounds pretty crude coming from a major political figure in a public statement (something you'd expect from Song Chu-yu, but not Ma), and he said it in a rather nasty tone, but again definitely not a death threat.

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I don't speak Mandarin, so I'm not going to argue with someone who does. What I WILL say is that some of the English language media disagrees - they're saying that Ma's statements can be interpreted as threats.

Which gets back to the point that Maddog made earlier in this thread. Everyone would agree that it's pretty innocent if an ordinary Taiwanese acquaintance says to me, "I know where you live."

But if a Taiwanese GANGSTER tells me the same thing, it instantly takes on the patina of a threat.

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